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harold camping, family radio, contingency plan, press conference, Jesus spiritual return, may 21, october 21, all judgments have been cancelled, last day of this earth, end of the church age in 1988, 1994

May 23, 2011

 

During my reports for the last six months, I have told people that Harold Camping had a contingency plan. He held a press conference on May 23, 2011 at 5:30 PM at the headquarters of Family Radio in Oakland that was also broadcast live on Family Radio where he was his usual arrogant self and showed no sign of the confusion he was in on Sunday morning when a television crew arrived at his home and surprised him when he opened the door. His stated to the reporter off camera that he was “flabbergasted” that Jesus had not returned and the rapture did not take place. At this press conference, Camping began his tirade by stating how surprised he was on May 21st that Jesus did not come back and the rapture did not take place. He told the audience that he did not know what to think or do and went with his wife to a motel in order to be left alone from all the media. He could not understand what had happened but he received an e-mail from a friend who explained what had taken place on May 21st.

Camping said this letter was not from a person who was a trained theologian but a simple person that was able to tell him what had happened on May 21st. He then read the letter of how Jesus had indeed come back on May 21, 2011, but it was a “spiritual” return and not a physical one. This storyline is not unique to the person who wrote this letter, but was the same line used by the false prophet William Miller, who falsely predicted that Jesus would return to earth on October 22, 1844. When Jesus did not return on the specified date, Miller told his dejected followers of some 50,000 persons who had sold their possessions and were waiting upon hilltops for the second coming, that Jesus had come back but he had to stop at the “heavenly sanctuary” where he was busy cleaning it up. Miller never told his followers where this sanctuary was located but that Jesus would return as soon as it was cleaned up. Ellen White and a remnant of the Millerites bought into this lie and founded the Seventh Day Adventist denomination.

People in 2011 are just as gullible as the people living in the United States in 1844 and Camping read this letter like it was from God. The letter writer stated that Jesus had come back spiritually and could not be seen. Since God is a merciful, he did not want people to suffer the five months of judgment that Camping had predicted and all judgments had been cancelled.

Camping then went off on a tangent of how the Bible states there is no hell and there is no Lake of Fire. When an unsaved person dies he just ceases to exist, there is no judgment no accountability. Camping stated that he once believed in hell and the Lake of Fire, but by reading the Bible he found out it is not true. God is a merciful and good and does not want anyone to suffer. Then he contradicted himself and said that when Jesus came back spiritually on May 21st, he did so to start the judgment on the unsaved people which will continue for five month until October 21, 2011 when God is going to end it all. The earth is going to be destroyed by fire, all unsaved people will die and cease to exist and the saved people are going to heaven. Camping forcefully stated that October 21, 2011 is the absolute last day of this earth. He stands by all his calculations and there aren’t any mistakes.

Camping emphatically stated many times in the last year that no one could be saved after May 21, 2011. Now he has flip-flopped and has said that people can get saved all the way up to October 21, 2011. As a skilled spin doctor, he began going back in time and told the reporters that it all began in 1988 when the church age was over and all churches were turned over to Satan by Jesus. Pastors and churches are the tools of Satan and people must come out of the churches if they want to be saved and follow Harold, who is the only one that knows what is going on.

The next five minutes of his monologue was spent on giving dates, numbers and dizzying the listeners with the interpretations of them. He repeatedly stated that he had predicted the end of the church age in 1988, his 1994 prediction was never wrong, he just did not know all the details, just like he did not know the details this time that Jesus was going to come spiritually and not physically. “I am just a humble teacher and I do not know all things,” said Camping, but now he knows for sure that October 21, 2011 is the final day for this earth.

He then went on to tell the reporters that there were not going to be any more billboards and programming on Jesus’ final return. Instead, Family Radio would concentrate on playing beautiful Christian music and faith building programs.

Any person who still believes that Harold Camping has the inside scoop and is trustworthy is completely blinded by evil spirits. God has turned Harold Camping into delusion and the staff at Family Radio has caved in to this egotistical individual, that even his own children and grandchildren have rejected.

With a new prediction and the staff of Family Radio going along with it, will it spell the death for Family Radio? When October 21, 2011 rolls around and nothing happens, Camping will have no more wiggle room. Only the brainwashed devotees will continue to listen to a new spin on October 22, 2011 and keep sending in their money. Family Radio cannot exist without the donations of its listeners, and once the bulk of them are gone, the finances will also vanish.

It looks like Craig Hulsebos and the rest of the staff do not have the courage to stand up to Harold Camping and throw him out. The church of Jesus Christ is alive and well, the Devil has not taken it over, but what Camping has not understood is that the Devil has taken over Family Radio. What a sad ending for a ministry that started with God and ended up with Satan.

 

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From the Desk of John S. Torell